Now Reading

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Simpkin
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Now Reading

Postby Simpkin » Tue Apr 10, 2012 2:26 pm

After the "Now Playing" section is running well, I thought it would be great, to tell everyone, what you're reading at the Moment. The Same procedure as in the "Now Playing" section ;)

On my List (mostly for University) are:

Tennesse Williams: A Streetcar named Desire

Stephen Chbosky: The Perks of being a Wallflower

William Shakespeare: Othello & Sonnett 18

John Steinbeck: The Winter of our Discontent

Kate Chopin: The Awakening

Harper Lee: To Kill a Mockingbird

J.D. Salinger: The Catcher in the Rye

William Faulkner: As I lay dying

Lord Byron: Selected Poems
Last edited by Simpkin on Wed Apr 11, 2012 9:35 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Now Reading

Postby Vanadane » Tue Apr 10, 2012 4:59 pm

Well, I'm not reading anything at the moment (discounting the half-read "Fellowship" currently residing on my bedside table), but I'm about to read The Complete Robot by Isaac Asimov, a collection of short stories which are part of his Robot universe. From there on the actual four Robot novels, then his Galactic Empire series, and then finally the seven Foundation novels in that series. In Asimov's preferred reading order, of course.

Some other books I'm looking forward to reading:
  • The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark by Carl Sagan
  • A Brief History of Time, A Briefer History of Time, The Universe in a Nutshell and The Grand Design by Stephen Hawking
  • God is not Great by Christopher Hitchens
  • The Blind Watchmater and The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins
  • Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
  • Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell
  • Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Wadbury
  • The Children of Men by P. D. James
  • The Chrysalids by John Wyndham
  • The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger
  • Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd by Nick Mason (PF's drummer)
  • The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells
  • 2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke

I'd also love to get back into The Lord of the Rings (my fingers would like Sauron to be lord of the Rights, but I won't let it happen!), but we'll see if I can manage the complexity once I've exhausted this list. Perhaps then onto The Hunger Games or something; I watched the film, and the books should be even better. Asimov should have written some pretty spectacular popular science stuff as well, so might check that out. A friend of mine is very much into WWII-esque literature, and our minds share many similarities, so perhaps he has some suggestions as well.

I'm curious to know what you'd think of me reading "Hitch" and Dawkins. Probably didn't expect that of me!
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Re: Now Reading

Postby WaterWolf » Tue Apr 10, 2012 9:12 pm

Good idea Simpkin ;)
I haven't really read anything in a while. Partly because of schoolwork and partly because I haven't felt motivated to do so, but I have the book: The Stone of Tears by Terry Goodkind, waiting for me in my bookshelf - Though I think that's more suited for a vacation where I'll actually have the time to read it. I've just ordered The Hunger Games trilogy, so I think I'll start on that soon though.
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Re: Now Reading

Postby Bydand » Tue Apr 10, 2012 9:32 pm

Currently reading a Danish-English dictionary!!!
Actually to be honest, I'm a bit unmotivated for reading at the moment after spending days reading up on EU and UN human rights and various articles from various viewpoints.

Vanadane, interesting reading list!!

Brief History of Time is a brilliant book and very easy to read. It's a rare book that can make quite complex science understandable to people with limited scientific knowledge and still be enjoyable reading.

I seen the Hitchens book in the shop but bought something else instead but it looked interesting.

The Dawkins God Delusion is a decent book but I think that his scientific viewpoint takes over from some of the more philosophical debates which he touches on in a small part but not enough, but then again, I'm saying that as a philosopher!!! While the section on the case against the design theory is a very good skeptical argument, I don't think he adresses the argument from universal causation at all and fails to see that his argument against God is equally valid against the Big Bang in that we don't or can't know what caused the cause of universl creation whether that be a singularity event or a divine being.

I'm curious to know what you'd think of me reading "Hitch" and Dawkins. Probably didn't expect that of me!

Not at all, it's a fascinating subject!!! I think it's obvious Dawkins point of view but it does provoke strong debate which can only be good. His scientific work is brilliant but his more philosophical work is a little over rated due in no small part to his very vocal religious skepticism. If you like reading these books, I'd also reccomend, The Good Book by A.C. Grayling and Selected Philosophical Writings by Rene Descartes.

I found Brave New World and all the Orwell books difficult to read but I think that was more a reflection of how I was feeling at the timeI read them. From the Orwell books I prefer Animal Farm over 1984 and I'd say the same for Brave New World. All are great books and still relevent today but while Animal Farm and Brave New World have some sense of a utopian world gone wrong, 1984 is just grim from start to finish.
If you like these books but would prefer something with a little bit more optimistic ending then I'd reccomend The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress and Stranger In A Strange Land both by Robert Heinlein.
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Re: Now Reading

Postby gemrox » Tue Apr 10, 2012 9:51 pm

Jeremy Clarkson - Born To Be Riled :D
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Re: Now Reading

Postby Vanadane » Tue Apr 10, 2012 10:10 pm

Bydand wrote:Currently reading a Danish-English dictionary!!! Well, apparently Danish is one of the easiest languages to learn for English speakers. Good luck with your endeavours!
Actually to be honest, I'm a bit unmotivated for reading at the moment after spending days reading up on EU and UN human rights and various articles from various viewpoints.

Vanadane, interesting reading list!!

Brief History of Time is a brilliant book and very easy to read. It's a rare book that can make quite complex science understandable to people with limited scientific knowledge and still be enjoyable reading.
I would expect nothing less from the "greatest living brain alive". ;)

I seen the Hitchens book in the shop but bought something else instead but it looked interesting.

The Dawkins God Delusion is a decent book but I think that his scientific viewpoint takes over from some of the more philosophical debates which he touches on in a small part but not enough, but then again, I'm saying that as a philosopher!!! While the section on the case against the design theory is a very good skeptical argument, I don't think he adresses the argument from universal causation at all and fails to see that his argument against God is equally valid against the Big Bang in that we don't or can't know what caused the cause of universl creation whether that be a singularity event or a divine being.
Well, I think of myself as being a philosophically scientifically-minded person, so it should be an interesting read.

I'm curious to know what you'd think of me reading "Hitch" and Dawkins. Probably didn't expect that of me!

Not at all, it's a fascinating subject!!! Perhaps now is the time to tell you I'll be reading them for, eh, "personal reasons" ... I think it's obvious Dawkins point of view but it does provoke strong debate which can only be good. His scientific work is brilliant but his more philosophical work is a little over rated due in no small part to his very vocal religious skepticism. If you like reading these books, I'd also reccomend, The Good Book by A.C. Grayling and Selected Philosophical Writings by Rene Descartes. Oh, Descartes! Very interesting work, the little I'm familiar with. I'll definitely look into that one.

I found Brave New World and all the Orwell books difficult to read but I think that was more a reflection of how I was feeling at the timeI read them. Well, that's certainly a relief from my point of view. Though I think after ploughing through endless Asimov, Hawking and such I will have much less trouble with more complex literature. From the Orwell books I prefer Animal Farm over 1984 and I'd say the same for Brave New World. All are great books and still relevent today but while Animal Farm and Brave New World have some sense of a utopian world gone wrong, 1984 is just grim from start to finish. Someone once said (I've no clue who) that Orwell feared that what we hate will ruin us, while Huxley feared that what we love will ruin us. And it seems like Huxley was right. I love dystopian ... anything, really, and the grimmer the better. I don't know why I have a hypothetical fondness of the world gone wrong.
If you like these books but would prefer something with a little bit more optimistic ending then I'd reccomend The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress and Stranger In A Strange Land both by Robert Heinlein. Thanks, I'll keep those in mind!

My responses in red. And I do start a lot of my sentences with "well". Rather informal (now that wasn't!).
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Re: Now Reading

Postby gaelwildflower » Tue Apr 10, 2012 10:49 pm

Fabulous idea, my dear Simpkin!

Cresent Dawn by Clive Cussler
Skeleton Coast by Clive Cussler
The Book of Acts in the Bible
1984 by George Orwell
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Re: Now Reading

Postby roadtrip » Wed Apr 11, 2012 4:27 am

Just finished A Change of Heart by Jody Picoult
Halfway through The Distant Hours - Kate Morton
Starting Ameritopia -Mark Levine
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Re: Now Reading

Postby Crunchie » Fri Jun 19, 2015 5:45 am

My partner has got me into reading Terry Pratchett for the first time, I must say I really enjoyed the Night Watch novels but I'm just reading through all of the books in order now. Some of the one-liners are just fantastic.

Awful lot of similar ideas and concepts to JK Rowlings efforts though. Can't help but think the Harry Potter universe has borrowed quite a lot of ideas from the discworld novels.
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Re: Now Reading

Postby DaveyTee » Fri Jun 19, 2015 7:21 am

I read all Iain M. Banks' "Culture" SF novels during the last couple of years and enjoyed them so much that I'm now going through them again. Currently on "Excession", the fourth in the eight-strong series.

I've tried Terry Pratchett's books but, sadly, never managed to get on with them.

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Re: Now Reading

Postby urbanite » Mon Aug 03, 2015 4:21 pm

Crunchie wrote:My partner has got me into reading Terry Pratchett for the first time, I must say I really enjoyed the Night Watch novels but I'm just reading through all of the books in order now. Some of the one-liners are just fantastic.

Awful lot of similar ideas and concepts to JK Rowlings efforts though. Can't help but think the Harry Potter universe has borrowed quite a lot of ideas from the discworld novels.


I get very angry when people compare the Rowling woman's tripe with Disc World.

Interesting that most of the reading referred to seems to be along the futuristic/sci-fi/fantasy lines.
I always have a Dorothy L Sayers on the go - I can read them with my eyes closed! Recently read a couple of Ursula Le Guin's Hainish novels - The Left Hand of Darkness and The Dispossessed (more sci-fi) - having read the Earthsea books a long, long time ago. Quite enjoyed LHD but Dispossessed didn't really go anywhere (despite, or in spite of, the journeys in space and across continents! and was particularly marred by a rather bad, unnecessary sex scene, which just made you wonder why it had been included.)
Heavy duty reading at the moment is a tome on the 19th century Edinburgh Sanitary Report, "Insanitary City" by Richard Rodger. I have to admit though that I'm finding it hard going as I do most of my reading in bed at night and the (physical) weight of this book doesn't really lend itself to that.
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